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Browsing Tag

depression

In Stress and Health

Are you depressed or just exhausted?

It’s pretty obvious when you’re sleep-deprived. The fogginess and fatigue in your body and mind are unmistakable. But how can you tell if you are just really tired, or if you are actually experiencing depression? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)Trusted Source, 1 in 3 adults in the United States don’t get enough sleep. The CDCTrusted Source further reports that people who get less than seven hours of sleep a night are more likely to report 10 common chronic…

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In Stress and Coping

Mindfulness is the future of being present

Mindfulness has occupied a central point in modern life. Probably, you are one of the many who is using this technique to deal with your high-paces, overstretched schedules. And this is not surprising because mindfulness has now become an accepted adjunct therapy for many conditions, especially in the field of mental health. Its pupillarity makes researchers refining the understanding of the power of paying attention in some of life’s most important moments . For all the research showing the benefits…

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In Stress and Coping

Getting a good night’s sleep

In today’s overscheduled society, sleep may feel like a luxury when, in fact it’s a necessity. Sleep is vital to our health, safety and overall well-being. Sleep recharges the brain, allowing it to learn and make memories. Insufficient sleep has been linked to car crashes, poor work performance and problems with mood and relationships. Sleep deprivation also raises the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, obesity, depression and stroke. Steps to Better Sleep Consider the following steps that…

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In Stress and Coping

Feeling Blue? Listen to This Type of Music

“Where words leave off, music begins.”― Heinrich Heine Beautiful but sad music can help improve mood when people are feeling blue, research finds. For the study 220 people recalled something depressing that had happened to them. They then recalled what type of music they had listened to afterwards. Choosing beautiful but sad music emerged as the only strategy that people thought had cheered them up. Dr. Annemieke van den Tol, the study’s first author, explained the results: ”We found in our research that…

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