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Stress and Coping

In Stress and Coping

How to live a stress-free life?

I like Dr. Wayne W. Dyer’s book titled The Power of Intention, the main idea of which is the author’s view expressed in his phrase “I want to feel good, I intend to feel good“.  Instead of re-writing the advice given in this book, I decided to offer you an excerpt from it. I hope you’ll have good minutes while reading about steps that would make your intention your reality. Fulfilling this intention to live a stress-free and tranquil life…

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In Stress and Coping

Why Meditate?

Reading Dr. Dyer’s book Getting the Gap, I found the thoughts that might be helpful for those who are interested in meditation as a means for staying stress-free and healthy. The author  emphasizes the idea that practicing meditation takes us on a fabulous journey into the gap between our thoughts, where all the advantages of a more peaceful, stress-free, healthy, and fatigue-free life are available. The paramount reason for daily meditation is to get into the gap between our thoughts…

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In Stress and Coping

Is Humour Always Healthy?

Humour is a cognitive ability to recognize comic and amusing elements of the events. The feeling of humour also is linked with the ability to discover the contradictions in the surrounding world. The word humour is derived from the Ancient Greek idea about medical states of four substances in the human’s body – blood, lymph, yellow and black humors (bile). In the ancient medical community, health and well-being were defined in the frames of these substances. The psychology of humour…

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In Stress and Coping

Is the mechanics of how you see things might be similar to perceiving stress?

In stress research, scientists tend to use the term “perceived stress”. The use of this word combination does make sense, because the same situation one person perceives as stressful, but the other person sees it as neutral. The explanations of assessing the event differently fall into both psychological and biological planes. The biological approach, that involves the science of ophthalmology, is quite interesting. Jeremy Wolfe, head of the Visual Attention Lab at Harvard Medical School, says that “[i[f we want…

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