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Stress and Health

In Stress and Health

Are the Physical Health and Mental Health Connected?

Ancient Greeks believed that balance can be achieved when you have a sound mind and a sound body. Many years of research in Western science showed that they were right. We are one integrated organism, rather than a random collection of independent parts. What affects the body affects the mind. Sometimes a physical condition might be the cause or a contributing factor to the mental distress. There is no doubt that apparent mental health symptoms can have a physiological basis.…

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In Stress and Health

Fat Distribution in the Body and Health

Within the problem of fat distribution in the body and health, the research is focused on the issues regarding the relationship between high fat foods and obesity or overweight of the population. It has been established the existence of the inherent limitations with the convention of grouping fatty acids based only on the number of double bonds, i.e. saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). This classification is being employed for the purpose of…

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In Stress and Health

What does health mean?

The English word “health” comes from the Old English word “hale”, meaning “wholeness, a being whole, sound or well”. The lexical unit “hale” derives from the Proto-Indo-European root “kailo”, which means “whole, uninjured, of good omen”. The most famous modern definition of health was created during a Preamble to the Constitution of the World Health Organization as adopted by the International Health Conference in 1946 and entered into force in 1948. This definition sounds as “[h]ealth is a state of…

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In Stress and Health

Stress and Heart Disease

If a decade ago it was quite hard to find information about coronary heart disease (CHD) in scientific publications, nowadays there is an extensive literature related to psycho-social factors of the CHD development.  The most consistent determinant of the CHD is a socioeconomic status. It has repeatedly been shown in epidemiological studies all over the world that the CHD is more common among people of a lower rather than a higher socioeconomic status. The lower socioeconomic position is considered to be a factor…

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